On Writing Tools, Revisited.

Revisiting On Writing Tools:

As I wrote in my previous article On Writing Tools, I use an iPad2 with an Adonit Writer Plus keyboard for the main bulk of my writing.

I wrote:
“With the advent of the iPad3, the iPad2 was dumped on the market, so I got myself an iPad2 with an Adonit Writer keyboard/iPad case combo. Although the keyboard is quite a bit smaller than a regular keyboard, the portability is incredible – weighing next to nothing, the iPad/Adonit joins my Kindle in the laptop compartment of the backpack I take everywhere. With its battery-life of ten working hours, the iPad is much better at working wireless than most laptops. I installed Apple Pages for iPad and transferred all works in progress to the iCloud and I’m a happy person.”
However, I stopped using Pages and started using Scrivener for Mac, using a MacBook Pro at home, and exporting scenes I’m working on to SimpleNote, so I can work them on my iPad.
Of course, there are some minor issues – SimpeNote is a simple note program, so it has no bold, italics or underlined function, nor does it do well with ellipsis or em-dashes. However, I found that working on the iPad, has two major advantages:

  1. the iPad has a substantially longer battery life, and doesn’t take long to start up.
  2. the iPad SimpleNote app features no distractions, so you’re not tempted to fiddle with formatting or editing, because you will do that later on the MacBook when you have the power of Scrivener to accommodate your needs.

Although I hope that Scrivener will release a version for iOS soon, I’m quite pleased with the Scrivener/SimpleNote functionality.

 

Addendum:

I shifted from proofreading on my old Kindle to proofreading epubs on my iPad. The touch screen makes highlighting much easier, the full-sized bluetooth keyboard makes notes easier and the list of highlights and notes is easier to delete by swiping the note in the list to the left.

On my Kindle, I could delete highlights/notes by pressing ‘delete’ on the small keyboard. If you have a newer Kindle without the keyboard, that might not work. On the other hand, if you just leave the list and upload a new version, you can easily delete the old version and take the editing list with it.

 

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One Comment on “On Writing Tools, Revisited.”

  1. […] The Editor doesn’t work on a computer screen. That’s why Writers print out their books and use a highlighter and a pen to edit their manuscripts. Alternatively, they make an e-book draft. […]

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